When My Black Brothers Hate Me

Today, a casting call for the highly-anticipated N.W.A. movie “Straight Outta Compton” was posted on the Internetz for all the world to see. The post called for girls of all shapes, sizes, and colors. As diverse and inviting such a notion could be, it was clear that a celebration of female diversity wasn’t in the works. Take a look…

Casting Call

That’s right. Categorizing women from Type A to Type D, light-skinned, racially ambiguous, big booty women were rated “hottest of the hottest,” while dark skinned women were relegated to the lowest of the low.

Infuriating doesn’t express my angst. Exasperation barely captures my annoyance with *some* Black men and their subservience to white dominance. Pity and shame nearly espouses my convictions towards the Black men who perpetuate white supremacy by devaluing the beauty of Black womanhood.

Black women know the struggles we face. From our hair to our looks, we’re constantly poked, pinched, and prodded by racist patriarchy designed to subvert the very nature of our being. Our human texture is constantly corroded to varying degrees based on not only our race or ethnic heritage, but the actual color of our skin.

The casting call highlights, underscores, and italicizes the potency of language. Intersectionality. Colorism. Two words that unpack the complexity of racism. Two words that I am grateful to have approached, learned, and ultimately confronted.

This incident is not one-dimensional. It is not insular nor singular. It’s an intricate fabric of history, self-hate, oppression, sexism, privilege, and patriarchy sewn together and knotted nicely under the quilt of racism.

Shall we take a trip down memory lane to the days of plantations and slave ships? To the days when light skinned mulattos were deemed pretty and acceptable enough to work in the house, while the darker, more “mongrel” of us worked in the fields? Shall we traipse through cotton fields and find Black female bodies so ravaged and mutilated so as to produce more and more labor for her white master?

A distant memory, in the 21st century we try (and fail … horribly) to move away from how brutal and thorough slavery was in establishing, maintaining, and concretizing racism. The most fantastically disheartening aspect of racism is how it’s inflicted and perpetuated by our own communities… namely by our men. Who we trust to protect and provide for us (thank you patriarchy).

What are Black women left to do when our own men will not support us?

It’s not surprising that *some* don’t… that *some* have fallen into the trap of white supremacy. But it is odd… you’d think that ALL Black men would have some awareness about how the proximity-to-whiteness maxim is yet another result of aged oppression. But they don’t. Instead, they ok stupid posts about hottest of the hottest women being as close to white as possible.

This isn’t to say that one can never call a light skin women beautiful, or even be partial towards them. The issue is the coupled devaluation and disgust with dark skinned women being perceived unequivocally as “less than.”

This post was stupid, offense, and probably disingenuous (I smell clickbait and free publicity) . But, at least for me, it revealed just how little progress has been made in the Black women’s fight for intersectional justice.

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Arielle Newton, Editor-in-Chief

Get at me: @BlackMusings

 

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10 responses to “When My Black Brothers Hate Me

  1. Of course Hollyjack is denigrating Black women from the get go! It’s insulting at worst on how society view us and how the media denigrate us like the worst of the worst based on this announcement. If we could have a lot of pride in ourselves, Black women will say “hell, no! Find someone white, do some CGI and leave us be. I would never support movies that only exploits the Black Culture for their own Hollywood benefit on the all mighty dollar.

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  2. Reblogged this on Readable Tidbits and commented:
    This is a post from Black Millennial Musings that really infuriates me to the core, about an announcement of recruiting all girls from 18-30 from all ethnicity, shapes and sizes. What’s really pissed me off is what Hollywood denigrates women of color to Class C and D like the worst of the low. I will never support this movie because it denigrates women of color, period. Black women should unite and demand our dignity and respect we all truly deserve.

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  3. “What are Black women left to do when our own men will not support us?
    It’s not surprising that *some* don’t… that *some* have fallen into the trap of white supremacy. But it is odd… you’d think that ALL Black men would have some awareness about how the proximity-to-whiteness maxim is yet another result of aged oppression. But they don’t. Instead, they ok stupid posts about hottest of the hottest women being as close to white as possible.”
    Well let me say that not all black men are unaware. I’m very aware of what’s going on. The media wants to promote anti-blackness every chance they get. We have to teach out children to le themselves and be proud of their culture and heritage. This type of colorism is a sickness and very outdated! The people doing the casting for this film should be ashamed of themselves! It’s time to speak out against this anti-black self hatred! I’m really getting tired of this crap!!

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